Play And Color In Black And White

Author: Marie Fordacq
Publisher: Twirl
ISBN: 2848019832
Size: 18.91 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 66

Activity meets creativity! Striking and stylish, sporting a uniquely sophisticated die-cut, flexi-plastic binding, Play and Color in Black and White is an activity book with a difference. The bold minimalist palette almost begs kids to decorate the 96 pages with bright color and whimsical imagination, using not only their crayons but also the more than 100 fluorescent neon stickers included with the book.

Black White And In Color

Author: Sasha Torres
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691016577
Size: 11.29 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 27

This book examines the representation of blackness on television at the height of the southern civil rights movement and again in the aftermath of the Reagan-Bush years. In the process, it looks carefully at how television's ideological projects with respect to race have supported or conflicted with the industry's incentive to maximize profits or consolidate power. Sasha Torres examines the complex relations between the television industry and the civil rights movement as a knot of overlapping interests. She argues that television coverage of the civil rights movement during 1955-1965 encouraged viewers to identify with black protestors and against white police, including such infamous villains as Birmingham's Bull Connor and Selma's Jim Clark. Torres then argues that television of the 1990s encouraged viewers to identify with police against putatively criminal blacks, even in its dramatizations of police brutality. Torres's pioneering analysis makes distinctive contributions to its fields. It challenges television scholars to consider the historical centrality of race to the constitution of the medium's genres, visual conventions, and industrial structures. And it displaces the analytical focus on stereotypes that has hamstrung assessments of television's depiction of African Americans, concentrating instead on the ways in which African Americans and their political collectives have actively shaped that depiction to advance civil rights causes. This book also challenges African American studies to pay closer and better attention to television's ongoing role in the organization and disorganization of U.S. racial politics.

Video Games You Will Never Play

Author: Luca Taborelli
Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN: 1537643797
Size: 11.11 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 87

How many video games have you played during your life? Do you think games are a form of art that should be preserved? What if we told you that there are thousands of interesting games you'll never play, all of which could be lost forever? It's true, there are many cancelled titles that are often lost to video game history. While video games may not be largely considered to be on par with paintings and statues, they are still art on their own, just like books, movies, and music, and like other works of art, video games have their own lost works. Games that were cancelled, never released, and often not even known by the general public. Unfortunately, there is no proper museum dedicated on saving them. Unseen64 is an online archive to preserve articles, screens and videos for cancelled, beta & unseen videogames. Every change and cut creates a different gaming experience: we would like to save some documents of this evolution for curiosity, historic and artistic preservation. Over the course of almost 500 pages, the 45+ writers and editors of this crowdsourced book hope to educate the gaming world on the history of video games as an ephemeral art form, by showcasing more than 200 lost games that could have been forgotten. Starting from early '90s PC titles, to 8-bit games for the NES and Sega Master System, and all the way through to the 7th generation of consoles with PS3, X360 and Wii, there are many unseen games that you will discover in this book. Also included are essays about the preservation of cancelled games, how to research for these unseen titles, and 20 interviews with museums and developers who worked on lost games. In this book there's plenty of examples of what gaming history is losing every day. Hopefully, by reading this book, more gamers, developers, youtubers, gaming journalists and historians can look back at what could have been and as a result raise awareness on the preservation of lost games: to see the hidden stories that played a part in leading gaming culture to where it is now. This is the black / white version of the book, the content is identical to the full-color version, the only difference is the cover and the interior color. Before to read this book, please keep in mind that: - The lost games featured in this book are just a small sample of all the titles we will never play. It would be impossible to list them all in just one book. - We are a collective of gamers from all around the world. - This book is fully in English, but most articles were written by Italians and people from other non-English countries. Each article was proofread by English native speakers, but there could still be typos and random engrish. - This book was made with love and sleep deprivation.

The Color Of Law A Forgotten History Of How Our Government Segregated America

Author: Richard Rothstein
Publisher: Liveright Publishing
ISBN: 9781631492860
Size: 15.41 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 18

"Rothstein has presented what I consider to be the most forceful argument ever published on how federal, state, and local governments gave rise to and reinforced neighborhood segregation." —William Julius Wilson In this groundbreaking history of the modern American metropolis, Richard Rothstein, a leading authority on housing policy, explodes the myth that America’s cities came to be racially divided through de facto segregation—that is, through individual prejudices, income differences, or the actions of private institutions like banks and real estate agencies. Rather, The Color of Law incontrovertibly makes clear that it was de jure segregation—the laws and policy decisions passed by local, state, and federal governments—that actually promoted the discriminatory patterns that continue to this day. Through extraordinary revelations and extensive research that Ta-Nehisi Coates has lauded as "brilliant" (The Atlantic), Rothstein comes to chronicle nothing less than an untold story that begins in the 1920s, showing how this process of de jure segregation began with explicit racial zoning, as millions of African Americans moved in a great historical migration from the south to the north. As Jane Jacobs established in her classic The Death and Life of Great American Cities, it was the deeply flawed urban planning of the 1950s that created many of the impoverished neighborhoods we know. Now, Rothstein expands our understanding of this history, showing how government policies led to the creation of officially segregated public housing and the demolition of previously integrated neighborhoods. While urban areas rapidly deteriorated, the great American suburbanization of the post–World War II years was spurred on by federal subsidies for builders on the condition that no homes be sold to African Americans. Finally, Rothstein shows how police and prosecutors brutally upheld these standards by supporting violent resistance to black families in white neighborhoods. The Fair Housing Act of 1968 prohibited future discrimination but did nothing to reverse residential patterns that had become deeply embedded. Yet recent outbursts of violence in cities like Baltimore, Ferguson, and Minneapolis show us precisely how the legacy of these earlier eras contributes to persistent racial unrest. “The American landscape will never look the same to readers of this important book” (Sherrilyn Ifill, president of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund), as Rothstein’s invaluable examination shows that only by relearning this history can we finally pave the way for the nation to remedy its unconstitutional past.

The Early Image Of Black Baseball

Author: James E. Brunson III
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 9780786454259
Size: 16.38 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 72

This volume examines early black baseball as it was represented in the artwork and written accounts of the popular press. From contemporary postbellum articles, illustrations, photographs and woodcuts, a unique image of the black athlete emerges, one that was not always positive but was nonetheless central in understanding the evolving black image in American culture. Chapters cover press depictions of championship games, specific teams and athletes, and the fans and culture surrounding black baseball.